What in the World is going on at CSX and Amtrak?

The latest round of tragic incidents at CSX and AMTRAK is causing a number of news outlets to reach out to Railroad Workers United to gain a rank & file worker perspective. In the past few months, RWU has been contacted by The Wall Street Journal, The Associated Press and several other news outlets, including a business journal that is based in none other than CSX’s hometown of Jacksonville, FL.

The Voice of the Working Railroader is what is Needed

The questions are wide ranging, understandably well intentioned, and urgent. The common complaint from the journalists that we have talked to is that they lack the perspective from union officials and working railroaders. Many of the journalists report that the company press agents as well as the unions are only willing to release broad generalized statements that offer no real content that would help them with their investigative reporting. RWU hopes to engage rank and file workers in the discussion, providing the media and the general public with the invaluable “inside” perspective that only working railroaders can provide.

CSX Background to Disaster

Before Mantle Ridge and their CEO, superstar Hunter Harrison hedged their way into CSX, employees had already been through several recent rounds of harsh top down management changes, decreed under Cindy Sanborn’s leadership. Union safety programs that were working with management were abolished. Company safety councils were implemented with no input from or involvement with union safety coordinators. Rules violations that were historically not a disciplined offense were now considered major rules infractions.

Very strict rules were put into place that were designed to address safety, especially rules pertaining to switching operations. Draconian attendance policies were put into place. Employees needing to mark off to visit the doctor were being disciplined due to the inhumane nature of these new policies. Seniority rosters were being dovetailed, causing workers to qualify at locations far from their home terminals, being forced to qualify upwards for thirty days or more on their own time (i.e., no paycheck) with no reimbursement for lodging.

And then came Hunter Harrison …

Operational rules that had been established under the previous regime were rolled back. Modes of operation that had been deemed unsafe were now considered normal practice. Workers that were never trained on many of these “new” procedures were being expected to just cope with old school style railroading (“kicking” cars into tracks, getting on/off moving equipment, performing “flying switches”, etc.) all part of what Hunter Harrison was branding, “Precision Railroading.”

Managers were being cut daily and were running scared that if they “made the cut”, that they might be next to be out of a job. Production numbers were being misrepresented to keep the new regime happy. The injuries and fatalities were mounting, crews were being worked to extreme fatigue levels, freight was not being delivered and shippers were not being serviced.

The deadly derailment involving a CSX freight train and an AMTRAK passenger train is reminiscent of the 2005 Graniteville, SC incident of a similar nature; i.e. a misaligned switch that resulted in a moving freight train running into another that was stationary. That wreck instigated the Federal Railroad Administration to issue an “Emergency Order” that resulted in the railroads issuing a new operating rule and a new a Switch Awareness Form that was to be completed by the Locomotive Engineer, Conductor and Train Dispatcher.

The new procedure was put into place to address the issue that seemingly may have been a major factor in this latest tragedy. However, under Sanborn, train dispatchers were cut, dispatcher desks were consolidated, and workers were being forced to dispatch territories they had never had the chance to physically see, nor were they given the proper “qualifying” time to become familiar with them.

According to CSX, the company’s “Precision Railroading” is taking a tad longer to implement but is in fact working. We would ask, “Working for who?” It might be working for the stockholders and hedge fund investors, but CSX employees, shippers, trackside communities, and passengers may beg to differ. At the end of the day, what remains to be seen is the long-term effects a profit hungry hedge-fund can do to a rail corporation when drastic changes are made to increase shareholder dividend and stock price at the expense of railroad safety. In the meantime, what appears to be happening – not just at CSX but throughout the rail industry – is a regular headline of yet another tragic news story concerning a train wreck, derailment, and/or dead or severely injured passengers and/or workers.

Meanwhile, at Amtrak …

While Amtrak is a different sort of rail carrier, one not obsessed with its short-term profits and the concerns of impatient stockholders, the company is similarly distracted by budget cutting, budget balancing and performance numbers, all at the expense of safety. At the end of 2017, newly hired CEO Richard Anderson (of Delta airlines “profitability” fame) took the helm and declared that Amtrak will – after 45 years – run in the black. A ‘buyout” of 500 managers was announced and the ranks of managers were decimated on December 31st, 2017. Meantime, the company is focused on cost-cutting at every turn in order to meet the lofty financial goals.

What all of this means for safe operations remains to be seen, but first glance at the wreck of Amtrak #501 in December points to a corporation that is potentially tainted by a “hurry up” culture to cut corners, get more production with less manpower, and is otherwise obsessed with short-term budget balancing than in long-term viability, health, and safety of the enterprise.

Conclusion

As much as the railroads would have us believe that safety is about slogans, programs, indoctrination, and “culture”, it is not. Safety is about pinpointing and eliminating hazards and allocating the necessary resources to eliminate them because these hazards are what lie behind each and every injury, every fatality, and every train wreck.

To solve the safety issues at Amtrak and CSX (and other railroads, or any corporation), the carrier must devote the adequate and necessary resources to ensure that every worker is properly equipped to do the job right every time. That means the corporation provides for adequate training, proper qualifying time, humane work schedules, adequate time off, proper maintenance of equipment, regular meeting with employee representatives, addressing and ameliorating hazards as they are identified, and a commitment to a high quality of work life for each and every employee involved in safety sensitive functions.

John Paul Wright – Railroad Workers United

 


20171120_175850

Advertisements

RWU Statement Upon the Acquittal of Canadian Railroad Workers

Press Release

For Immediate Release

For more information Contact: Ron Kaminkow, RWU General Secretary

email: secretary@railroadworkersunited.org

RWU Statement Upon the Acquittal of Canadian Railroad Workers

 Railroad workers – together with all citizens concerned with worker justice – across the continent are celebrating the acquittal of Canadian railroaders who were wrongly accused by the Crown for the tragedy at Lac-Mégantic in which 47 people were killed when a long and heavy oil train crashed and exploded in the middle of that small town in July of 2013.

 At the time of the wreck, Railroad Workers United (RWU) had spoken out quickly, releasing a statement within a week condemning the reckless practices on the rail carrier – the Montreal, Maine and Atlantic (MM&A) – and its renegade CEO Ed Burkhart. Since then, RWU has defended the railroad workers, denying that they in any way should be charged with a criminal offense, demanding that the charges be dropped, and that the Crown charge the real criminals – the MM&A bosses and the government regulators who had turned a blind eye to their irresponsible actions regarding safety.

 Once the workers were arrested, RWU took part in protest actions, assisted with organizing a defense committee, began raising funds for the defense, and attempted to raise awareness of the issue on both sides of the border. Despite the overwhelming evidence of company recklessness and irresponsibility, the Crown refused to drop the charges, and proceeded onward to the trial which finally commenced – more than four years after the event – in September 2017.

 While the prosecution focused largely on a single event – the alleged failure of the locomotive engineer to tie enough handbrakes, they were tripped up at every turn by their own witnesses – government, company, “expert” and otherwise – who, by their testimony, incriminated the company and the government regulators rather than the defendants.

 Some of the highlights that were revealed at the trial include:

1 – The implementation of single employee train crews just months earlier, had played a key role in the wreck. One other railroad that had been operating trains in this fashion for years (QNSL) had provided 10 days of training and made 69 safety accommodations prior to the implementation of such operations. The MM&A did none of these, while the government stood idly by. After the wreck however, Transport Canada outlawed the further implementation of the practice.

2 – The MM&A had allocated practically no funding for safety or emergency training, nor standardization of rules compliance, and had a terrible safety record compared to most rail carriers.

3 – The train in question was thousands of tons over limit. Significantly, the company had no set policy for the number of handbrakes that were necessary to secure such trains. That number remains in question, but experts now agree that the number for such a train on such a grade is well more than had been considered at the time.

4 – The train – by company policy – was left unattended on the mainline on a steep grade with no derail or other means of protection against runaway.

5 – The train’s lead locomotive was defective, and ultimately this fact would catalyze the runaway. Despite awareness of this fact, the company had failed to make necessary repairs to it, nor utilize it as a trailing unit in the consist. In addition, the mainline trackage was in a dilapidated state because of deferred maintenance by the carrier.

6 – Company policy was to leave the train’s automatic brake in the release position, even though the generally accepted practice by railroad policy and law is to leave unattended trains with the automatic brake in the “full-service” (fully applied) position. Every car of the train could have had its air brakes fully applied, but the company – against general rule and wisdom of a hundred years – insisted that engineers not set the air brakes on the train when leaving the train alone. Had this reckless and bizarre policy not been insisted upon by MM&A, the train almost certainly could not have rolled away.

All told over the course of four months, the jury gained a picture of a railroad company that was oblivious to safety concerns, one far more interested in making money than in the safety of its workers or trackside communities. While RWU applauds the jury’s verdict and sees the acquittal as a victory – not just for the MM&A railroad workers but for all railroad workers – we must remain vigilant.

Railroad carriers in the U.S., Canada and elsewhere are intent on criminalizing employees, pointing the finger at them when something goes wrong, as a means of deflecting attention away from their own failures, whether it be inadequate training, lack of qualifying time, chronic crew fatigue, deferred maintenance, dangerously long and heavy trains, inadequate staffing and more. Railroad workers must be ready, willing and able to come to one another’s defense to prevent the rail carriers and the state from criminalizing our behavior while they – the real criminals – get off Scott free.

20171120_175850

Casey Jones in #LacMegantic

Casey Jones in #LacMegantic

06012014

 

Come all railroaders because you need to hear!

A story bout a fellow Engineer.

Tom Harding is the hogger’s name and

for the crimes of Ed Burkhart they are tryin’ to blame.

 

Ol’ fast Eddie’s train blew up a town,

he trying to spread the disasters around,

Wisconsin, Quebec and overseas.

They want to frame our brother, while Ed runs free.

 

While the town of Lac-Megantic was up in flames,

He said he saw nothing wrong with a one man train!

The Government said “run em with one employee,”

And this oil boom is making a ton of cash for me.

 

The people of Lac-Megantic said it was not fair

For fast Eddie to go around railroadin’ everywhere.

Buyin’ short-lines just to run em’ in the ground,

Making arrogant statements while we burn to the ground!

 

Down in the good ol’ US of A,

There’s a fight going on today.

On a Short-line in Ohio land,

The W&LE wants to run one man.

 

Negotiations have been going on for a long time,

The workers have already been out on the picket line,

The talks are stalled and at a Stalemate,

Because the one man plan they won’t negotiate!

 

So people of Ohio, you’d better listen up!

What town do you want the railroad to blow up?

There’s was nothing safe about a One man train

When poor Lac-Megantic was up in flames!

 

[CHORUS]

Old fast Eddie blew up a town,

Now they want to spread disasters around,

A one man train it is not safe!

Say NO to the route the railroads want to take!

 

While the unions are fighting in Washington Town,

We better get some boots down on the ground.

Federal law trumps law in the states,

All the tools in the box, is what it’s gonna take.

 

So Listen to the moral of this story,

Like Casey Jones of old in history.

The worker gets the blame, especially if their dead,

The Railroads and the Government sleepin’ in the same bed!

 

Casey Jones there’s a lot of them around,

Casey Jones won’t put the reverser down.

Casey  on the W&LE,

Is dyin for a bit of solidarity!

John Paul Wright

RWU Organizer

 

cropped-sticker_20-_20rwu_20fix_20the_20hazards_20color_original.jpg

Railroad Union Organizer 101

When I was actively organizing on the property, I started organizing several projects that I would have liked to see come to fruition. I had successfully organized one of Railroad Workers United’s first chapters as well as organized two all craft’s union meetings that were attended by over 20 people with several crafts represented.

The primary goal was to educate and mobilize enough members of the RWU chapter to run for positions in their respective unions. Though our organizing efforts, I concluded that many of the elected safety council members and union officials had become too close to management and needed to be replaced.

Safety Councils

Organizing a local union safety council that was not behavioral based, was one of my main organizing priorities. To do this, it seemed that almost the entire leadership of the local union needed to be replaced. A serious educational drive needed to be put in place to educate the membership of the dangers of participating in the toxic behavior-based union/management programs that had been the norm for decades. The union membership had to basically be re-programmed away from the process that had been established by years of company produced safety videos and company “ways of thinking.”

Safety is of the utmost importance and an effective way to claim power on the railroad shop floor. The Railway Labor Act and its draconian processes of law and order had caused many leaders to shy away from any thoughts of getting uppity. Safety actions are a fine way around that law allowing the union wield power and solidarity. If safety actions are done correctly, many work stoppages and other forms of Intelligent Militancy could be used without liability to the union however, intelligent forms of militancy would need to be supported by more than just a few local members and leaders.

The membership of the local union would need to be educated enough in the process and strong enough to deal with the union leaders who are opposed to this sort of direct action. The union would also need to be organized enough to stand against retaliation and attacks from management who have been professionally trained to deal with workers who have become organized.

Organizing up the chain of command

Recognizing the need to confront corruption at the General Committee level, I ran for Teamster Delegate. This was a very challenging task. Most members of the BLET were not taught the Teamster Delegate process and I had to campaign with a membership that existed in several southern states with roughly 2200 members spread out all over the south. Many BLET members are not aware of their own Teamster status or the benefits of being organized in the industrial union that the Teamster union is.

In my frustrated days, I felt as if I was starting at the beginning at every turn of the process. I would say to myself that these guys just didn’t care about their union. I knew from our shop floor conversations that

it wasn’t that they didn’t care, it was that they just didn’t know how to care or been given the opportunity to be fully involved in the process.

Countless times I was asked, “why are we organized with the Truckers union?” or “why are we in a competing union?” These are questions that should have been answered years ago when the BLET was brought into the Teamsters. Many folks didn’t like the idea of dues being what they thought was double. It is easy to understand their frustrations. Especially if part of the educational process is teaching the membership that there is a vibrant movement within the Teamsters union to address anti-democratic union corruption.

And, I was representing that.

Who could these brothers and sisters go to when they needed to be assured that I was the real deal? The only other union people they knew, were the people that I was running against. There was a vibrant campaign being run in the background to eliminate my dissent from the norm. The General Committee of Adjustment (GCA) was against my run for delegate from day one of the campaign. Not only were they against the idea of being challenged, they were also not in support of the Democratic Union election process that came because of the Teamster affiliation.

Teamster democracy is different than the long-held modes of democracy that the BLET has held for over 150 years. In Teamster elections, members are encouraged to participate in the election of representatives to the National Convention. The minute I filed my intention to run, it was full bore get this guy out of the picture.

In the early days of the delegate campaign, I was invited to dinner with a member of the GCA. At the meeting, it was told to me that I was going against the culture of the BLET. I was informed that GCA normally would not participate in elections and they would just let the General Chairman go to the convention. It was suggested, without documentation, not to run by a representative of my union. This same representative ran for a Vice President position in the One Member, One Vote Elections of the BLET.

Out of 2200 members, less than 350 voted. I lost by few votes and almost won a chance to represent our membership as the Teamster Delegate at the National Convention. The rules of the election were not followed. Announcements of elections were not placed on bulletin boards. I could have buried the GCA in federal election protests and paperwork, but I chose not to do that. Not to mention, it takes tons of work to organize a run against a GCA who is actively erasing all your campaigning and spreading rumors about your intentions and character.

If union based safety councils, all craft coalitions and joint meetings are going to be organized and allowed to survive and grow in the current corrupted business union / organized by craft model, serious reforms from the bottom up are going to have to be put into motion. There will be an urgent importance for the coalitions to reach out to each other for support. The rail unions in their current state of un-organization have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo by keeping democratic reformers and members who want an active union on the defensive.

I have found that the majority view of the membership leans to a more forward-thinking – big picture direct action model, however, using the draconian Railway Labor Act as a shield, the rail craft union leadership have found sway to play smoke and mirror games with the membership. The leadership knows they are legally not allowed to strike. If the rules are written against the union using its most effective weapon, then the majority holds the key to direct action/ intelligent militancy in the safety department.

Knowing this to be the case, the railroad companies have gone to great lengths to keep railroad craft unions fighting one another while creating safety resources that are actually meant to reprogram union workers into thinking that they are always at fault. The practice of paying the salaries of union officials participated in safety programs is no different than a corporation paying off a government official for a favor.

The Federal Employers Liability Act was enacted to give railroad union members a legal path to sue the railroads for negligence. The Behavior-Based Safety committees that are labor/management organized and in some cases financially paid for by the railroad corporations have been put in place to keep railroaders from accessing this law and further put in place to keep the unions from using safety as a tool to gain power on the shop floor.

cropped-sticker_20-_20rwu_20fix_20the_20hazards_20color_original.jpg

 

 

JP Wright

RWU Organizer

A Decade of Passenger Train Wrecks – What Has Gone Wrong?

Official Statement of Railroad Workers United

Amtrak Train #501, derailed on a 30 MPH curve outside of DuPont, WA Monday, December 18th, killing 3 and injuring scores of others. Soon after, it came to light that the train was traveling at 78 MPH, well above the proscribed speed. Coming on the heels of at least five major passenger train wrecks in the U.S. over the course of the last decade, one questions, why do these tragedies continue to occur?

Train wrecks are no different than most disasters in that they are often the result of a constellation of factors, many hidden from view and potentially years in the making. We miss the point when we simply pinpoint the worker who “screwed up” and fail to further scrutinize the situation. Most – if not all – of these underlying factors can be unknown to the individual worker, who usually has little or no control over any of them.

These factors have to do with corporate and government policy, and include but are not limited to: poor work schedules, chronic crew fatigue, limited time off work, inadequate staffing, lack of training, improper qualifying, task overload, deferred maintenance, antiquated infrastructure, and failures to implement available safety technology. It is almost never just one of these factors, but a very complex web that – when taken together – can result in disaster.

Training, Rest, Qualifying

The first place to start our inspection might be to examine if the train’s crew was properly trained, and had in their grasp the “technical proficiency” to carry out the job safely and efficiently. Were crew members provided a schedule that ensured adequate rest and time off the job? Finally, is the question of “qualification.” All conductors and engineers must – by law and company policy – be “qualified” on the physical characteristics over which they operate their trains. Once they are technically qualified – and this is crucial – crews should now be “familiar” with this territory.

From what we have learned from preliminary reports, the crews were “group” qualified in a very unprofessional and slipshod manner, which failed to render them “familiar”. John Risch, the national Legislative Director for the SMART Transportation Division, a rail union of engineers and trainmen, including Amtrak conductors, believes that,

“All the railroads in the country, including Amtrak, do not require training like they should. Time and time again we have urged the railroads to allow more training trips before they go out, and they will say one or two trips is enough. It’s a cost issue … That’s something that has been a problem.”

Adequate and Proper Staffing

The major train wrecks in the past decade in North America include: Metrolink #111 at Chatsworth, CA (2008); Metro-North #816 at Spuyten Duyvil, NY (2013); Amtrak #188 at Frankford Junction, PA (2015); New Jersey Transit Train #1614 at Hoboken, NJ (2016); and now this week’s crash of Amtrak #501 at DuPont, WA (2017). Worthy of note in all five crashes is the fact that there was a lone operator in the cab of the locomotive. (Note: In addition, the worst freight train disaster in the history of Canada – MM&A Train #2 at Lac-Mégantic, QC in 2013 – was likewise in the charge of a single crew member).

While the rail carriers and their allies may discount this fact, it obviously is a question worthy of further consideration and investigation. Passenger jet airliners have two qualified and certified operators in the cockpit. Is it not time to consider that passenger and freight trains might also require such staffing? 

(Note: In the case of the recent crash in Washington state, there was another employee in the cab. But ironically, not only was this employee not a crew member and not qualified on the physical characteristics and therefore unaware of the upcoming speed restriction, his presence in the cab was potentially distracting to an engineer who himself was potentially improperly qualified and unfamiliar).

Train Control Technology

Following the Chatsworth wreck in 2008, Congress passed the Rail Safety Improvement Act (RSIA) which among other things, mandated that a sizable percentage of US rail trackage – including those tracks which were used by passenger trains – must be protected by a technology known as Positive Train Control (PTC) by the end of 2015. While the rail carriers dragged their feet on implementation, the number of potentially preventable wrecks added up. Then in December of 2015, the rail carriers literally threatened to shut down operations – and hence the country – if they were not granted an extension.

Congress granted it and then some.

The new deadline is now the end of 2018, with possible extensions granted until the end of 2020! Could many, most, or all of these wrecks have been prevented had PTC been in place? There is of course no way to know, but given the consensus on PTC’s capabilities, quite likely. But ironically, with or without PTC, technology known as Automatic Train Control (ATC) has existed for a century, and is effective at preventing such accidents like the one at Dupont, WA. In bygone days, it protected thousands of miles of mainline trackage, but in recent decades has mostly been dismantled by the industry as a “cost-saving” measure, while government regulators turned a blind eye.

Lack of Infrastructural Commitment

Today, railroads around the world have been making significant advances in efficiency, safety, and general infrastructure. Not so in the U.S. Railroads mostly continue to operate on gradients laid in the 19th century, full of curvature, steep grades, and other impediments to safe and efficient operation. When upgrades are made, they are often inadequately funded, leading to unsafe conditions for employees, passengers and those living trackside.

Unless and until this nation can make a commitment to advancing modern passenger train transportation through adequate and necessary funding, we will continue to lag behind the rest of the world, and continue to suffer tragedies like the one in Dupont, WA.

One need only look to the example of the Japanese Bullet Train – the Shinkansen – which in over half a century has carried more than 10 billion passengers, yet has suffered not one single passenger fatality due to derailments or collisions.

Conclusion

The wreck on December 18th of Amtrak train #501 is yet another example of a needless tragedy, that has been – like others before it – in incubation, years in the making due to a myriad of irresponsible and reckless actions and attitudes on the part of the rail carriers and the federal regulators. While we might respect the expert analysis and conclusion of the NTSB, due in the coming months and years, we understand and appreciate the fact that the agency is limited to a tactical analysis of the wreck.

Larger questions of ideology, policy, economics, and politics generally do not enter that agency’s equation when attempting to analyze the cause of this or that specific train wreck. But as railroad workers, we are free of those constraints, and as a result, have a more unobstructed view of the bigger picture.

As rank & file railroad workers we experience day-in-and-day-out the carriers’ cynical view of safety, the push for profit, the demand for increased stock prices, the budget cutting, the recklessness, and the total disregard for workers’ lives. THIS is why Train #501 wrecked.

THIS is why we continue to have Chatsworths, Lac-Mégantics, Frankford Junctions, and all the rest. It is high time that we make a real commitment to modern, efficient, green, and safe rail transportation, and do what it takes to achieve it.

The Railroad Union  Salary/Expense Report for 2017 brought to you by RWU

CONCESSIONS FOR YOU –

RAISES AT THE TOP

Are you getting your dues worth?

The Railroad Union 

Salary/Expense Report for 2017

brought to you by RWU

 

Introduction

While RWU regularly challenges the perspectives, strategies and tactics of our unions’ leadership, the question above was regularly posed in the recent discussion around the recent national agreement. We have no problem with officers being paid well, but when many of us work hard in arctic wind chills and 100+ degree heat index, how can compensation that is sometimes 2-3-4 times that of the average rank & file worker be justified? While some on the report have integrity, are hard-working officials or skilled attorneys and fight for the members, it’s fair to say that some have the audacity to sell us concessions that negatively impact our quality of life, while we foot the bill for their lavish lifestyle.

Rank-and-File Democracy is one of Railroad Workers United’s six Statement of Principles. “Union leadership is all too often out of touch with the needs and issues of the membership. We need unions that are built upon democratic control by their members, unions that are not simply dues collection agencies for a few highly paid officials with jobs-for-life. We need constitutional provisions that include, but are by no means limited to: direct election of officers at all levels, including General Chairmen; the right to recall of officers; salary and expenditure limits; an end to special perks and privileges; proportional representation at conventions; and guarantees of protection for minority and dissenting views.”

In the spirit of full disclosure and transparency, which is a right of every dues paying member, RWU presents this report as food for thought. All of the information was obtained from year 2016 LM-2 financial reports filed by each union representing members on the railroad. The information is factual and nonpartisan, and includes every officer that receives in excess of $100,000 in salary and expenses.

You can find out how much your local spent on salaries, benefits, and representation last year by looking at its LM-2 report at the Department of Labor website at https://olms.dol-esa.gov/query/getOrgQry.do

 What is an LM-2? An LM-2 is a form that most unions file with the Department of Labor each year that gives a breakdown of the organization’s finances. It can show you how much your union officers get paid, how your union is spending its money, and more.

Our other 5 statement of principles are:

Unity of All Rail Crafts:  For decades the carriers have played one craft off against the other to our mutual detriment. This lack of unity has contributed greatly to our lack of power, which has in turn hampered our ability to negotiate and enforce good contracts. We are unable to effectively confront the carriers on issues of vital concern to our membership attendance, crew fatigue, discipline, safety, etc. because we are divided. The carriers are degrading and deskilling our crafts, implementing new technologies that threaten our jobs, our safety and livelihoods, propose the dismantling of FELA, demand drastic health care concessions, and more. In the face of this aggressive attack, is there any doubt of the need for the greatest possible cross-craft unity? Therefore, Railroad Workers United supports the greatest possible unity and cooperation between all rail crafts and unions both at the leadership level and among the rank-and-file.

An End to Inter-Union Conflict:  We condemn any and all hostilities between the rail unions. The open warfare between the UTU and the BLET is especially to be condemned. We demand an immediate halt to the irresponsible and reckless name calling, mudslinging and finger pointing that the leadership has long engaged in. We favor neither union in this or in any other — destructive fratricide between brothers and sisters who are each other’s’ natural allies.

Membership Participation and Action:  In addition to building unity and democracy, it is of equal importance that we build a rail labor movement based on the mass action of the members themselves. For too many years we have allowed our unions to be “led” by a small handful, while the average union member has remained uninformed, uninterested and uninvolved. In order to effectively stand up to the carriers, we must overcome the cynicism, apathy and despair of the ranks, and build in its place a union of inspired, educated, and active members who are willing to take action on the job in defense of our jobs and our unions.

Solidarity:  For years, we have allowed the Carriers to whipsaw craft against craft, member against member. It’s time we returned to the labor standard of “An injury to One is an Injury to All!” Only when we stand up for each other, go to bat for each other, and take action on the job in defense of each other, will we have a strong union. Remember, this is how unions were built in the first place! If the carmen on the BNSF in Seattle are under attack, we ALL are under attack. When UP engineers are threatened, we ALL are threatened. Railroad Workers United strives to rebuild this spirit of solidarity.

No to Concessionary Bargaining:  After decades of concessionary bargaining, rail workers have practically come to expect lousy contracts. We say NO! to further give-backs at the bargaining table. If the union cannot at least maintain the current standard of living and working conditions for its members, it will become increasingly irrelevant in their lives. We are committed to a coordinated bargaining strategy of all rail unions. We pledge ourselves to oppose any and all concessions at the bargaining table, and pledge to build a fighting movement of rank-and-filers that includes all railroad crafts to take the necessary action to defend our jobs, our livelihoods, our rights and our union!

For more information on how to join RWU go to www.railroadworkersunited.org

 

The Railroad Union Salary/Expense Report 2017

 

AMERICAN TRAIN DISPATCHER ASSOCIATION (ATDA)

ATDA Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Div.
Francis McCann $ 156,573 $ 21,293 $ 177,866 President Nat.
Larry Dowell $ 143,971 $ 73,930 $ 217,901 Secretary/ Treasurer Nat.
Paul Ayers $ 134,582 $ 18,884 $ 153,466 Vice President Nat.
John Salvey $ 134,582 $ 20,918 $ 155,500 Vice President Nat.
Robert Sermark $ 132,211   $  2,329 $ 134,540 Director of Research Nat.
Kenneth Bennett $ 109,709   $  1,531 $ 111,240 Assistant Director of Research Nat.

 

ATDA Members 2996

 

BROTHERHOOD OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER AND TRAINMEN (BLET)- INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS (IBT)

BLET Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
Stephen Bruno  $ 181,746  $ 39,411  $       221,157 Secretary Treasurer National
Cole David  $ 169,437  $ 40,150  $       209,587 Vice President National
Richard Gibbons  $ 169,437  $ 38,364  $       207,801 Vice President National
Gilbert Gore  $ 169,437  $ 35,786  $       205,223 Vice President National
James Louis  $ 169,437  $ 32,362  $       201,799 Vice President National
Dennis Pierce  $ 222778
$            0
 $ 34023
$          0
 $       256,801 President,
President Rail Conference
National,
IBT
Michael Priester  $ 169,437  $ 35,160  $       204,597 Vice President National
Edgar Pruitt  $ 181,746
$     6,000
 $ 31,713
$          0
 $       219,459 1st Vice President,
VP Rail Conference
National,
IBT
Marcus Rueff  $ 169,437  $ 73,029  $       242,466 Vice President National
John Tolman  $ 169,437  $ 40,190  $       209,627 Vice President National
Michael Twombly  $ 169,437  $ 46,110  $       215,547 Vice President National
Paul Aird  $ 122,026  $ 19,256  $       141,282 Special Representative National
Albert Cook III  $ 133,228  $ 14,711  $       147,939 Director of Benefits National
Douglas Davidson  $ 115,246  $   6,256  $       121,502 Director of Arbitration National
David Ditzel  $ 122,026  $ 11,569  $       133,595 Special Representative National
John Fink  $ 117,217  $   2,720  $       119,937 Director of Bylaws Admin National
Robert Hagan  $ 100,475  $ 40,331  $       140,806 Dir of Political Affairs National
Matthew Kronyak  $ 122,026  $ 27,301  $       149,327 Special Representative National
Megan Mead  $ 122,026  $   1,798  $       123,824 Director of Compliance National
Richard Olson  $ 122,026  $ 13,407  $       135,433 Special Representative National
Thomas Pontolillo  $ 156,775  $   3,989  $       160,764 Director of Research National
Gregory Ross  $ 107,071  $      780  $       107,851 Director of Communications National
Walter Schmidt  $ 110,537  $ 11,301  $       121,838 Director of Online Services National
Vincent Verna  $ 126,814  $   8,103  $       134,917 Dir of Reg Affairs National
Jason Wright  $ 122,026  $ 32,345  $       154,371 Special Representative National
Ronald Sprague  $ 105,000  $   2,093  $       107,093 Local Chairman Division 28
Mark Wallace  $ 144,844  $ 28,670  $       173,514 General Chairman General Committee 4
Jerry Sturdivant  $ 122,333  $ 41,537  $       163,870 1st Vice GC General Committee 4
Frederick Cox  $ 115,687  $ 25,706  $       141,393 2nd Vice GC General Committee 4
Daniel Hannah  $ 197,994  $ 56,336  $        54,330 General Chairman General Committee 177
Brian Carr  $ 116,538  $ 41,744  $       158,282 1st Vice GC General Committee 177
Kevin Sexton  $ 152,358  $   8,808  $       161,166 General Chairman General Committee 269
Dewayne Dehart  $ 142,033  $ 20,272  $       162,305 General Chairman General Committee N&W
Robert Peters  $ 128,283  $   6,263  $       134,546 1st Vice GC General Committee N&W
Brian Mills  $ 127,406  $ 18,760  $       146,166 General Secretary Treasurer  
Larry Fannnon  $ 118,468  $ 32,815  $       151,283 General Chairman  
Peter Semenek  $ 137,280  $   7,531  $       144,811 General Chairman  
James Dent Jr  $ 155,282  $ 13,192  $       168,474 General Chairman  
Dana Marlow  $ 128,388  $ 11,233  $       139,621 1st Vice GC  
BJ Brown  $ 112,513  $   6,900  $       119,413 General Chairman C&S, FWD & JTD BNSF RAILWAY
John Karakian  $ 157,528  $ 13,251  $       170,779 General Chairman Grand Trunk western
Kyle Bagby  $ 156,245  $ 12,175  $       168,420 Vice General Chairman UP
Ronnie Rhodes  $ 136,996  $ 11,517  $       148,513 General Chairman UP
John Reynolds  $ 136,231  $ 24,844  $       161,075 General Chairman Wisconsin Central
Mark Kenny  $ 169,592  $ 31,521  $       201,113 General Chairman Amtrak
David Estes  $ 103,424  $ 34,134  $       137,558 Vice General Chairman Amtrak
Steven Leyshon  $ 130,927  $ 33,216  $       164,143 General Chairman UP western region
James Dayton  $ 107,540  $ 20,851  $       128,391 General Chairman UP western region
Jeffrey Thurman  $ 128,714  $   2,180  $       130,894 General Chairman St louis-san Francisco
Edward Laprath  $ 148,533  $ 57,387  $       205,920 General Chairman Burlington northern
Matthew Wilson  $ 101,747  $       572  $       102,319 1st Vice GC Burlington northern
Matthew Brandt  $ 144,084  $ 28,769  $       172,853 3rd Vice chairman Burlington northern
Steven Halbrook  $ 107,854  $ 19,874  $       127,728 4th Vice Chairman Burlington northern
William Lyons  $ 118,959  $             –  $       118,959 General Chairman Csxt
Jeff Scott  $ 103,682  $       271  $       103,953 Vice General Chairman Csxt
Kenneth Cummins  $ 124,419  $   1,306  $       125,725 1st Vice GC Chicago and Northwestern
Richard Crow  $ 138,587  $   6,733  $       145,320 General Chairman Chicago and Northwestern
Clay Craddock  $ 153,055  $ 22,886  $       175,941 General Chairman CN Illinois Central
Matt Thornton  $ 121,601  $   7,553  $       129,154 General Chairman Csxt Western Lines
Warren kerley  $ 110,742  $ 10,995  $       121,737 Senior Vice GC csxt Western Lines
James Holdcraft  $ 163,466  $ 32,900  $       196,366 General Chairman Santa Fe RR
Michael Cunningham  $ 146,103  $   2,539  $       148,642 1st Vice GC Santa Fe RR
Chris Mosser  $ 148,603  $ 35,433  $       184,036 Secretary Treasurer Santa Fe RR
Patrick Driscoll  $ 129,644  $       636  $       130,280 General Chairman Consolidated Rail Corp
David Geisler  $ 123,374  $ 33,479  $       156,853 General Chairman UP Eastern Region
Garrison Best  $ 137,991  $   8,394  $       146,385 General Chairman Eastern Railroad Lines
Timothy Smith  $ 126,146  $ 14,597  $       140,743 Chairman California
Gary Pedigo  $ 126,022  $   7,854  $       133,876 Chairman Texas
Paul Pikarski  $ 113,663  $ 28,459  $       142,122 General Chairman Illinois Legislative Board
James Hoffa  $ 309,927  $ 76,417  $       386,344 General President IBT
Richard Ken Hall  $ 210,692  $ 72,584  $       283,276 General Secretary- Treasurer IBT
John Murphy  $ 155,355  $ 30,014 $        185,369 International VP,
Director of Rail Conference
IBT

BLET Members    56,855

Teamster Rail Conference Members   92,728

BROTHERHOOD OF MAINTENANCE OF WAY (BMWED) – INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS (IBT)

BMWED Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Federation
Freddie Simpson  $ 182,577
$    75,000
 $ 16,606
$  13,564
 $    287,747 President,
International Vice President
National,
IBT
Perry Geller SR  $ 171,244
$   12,000
 $ 26,230
$           0
 $    183,244 Secretary Treasurer,
Secretary Treasurer Rail Conference
National,
IBT
B.G. Glover  $     149,638  $     17,806  $    167,444 Vice President National
D R Scoville  $     149,638  $     17,806  $    167,444 Vice President National
R D Sanchez  $     149,638  $     68,924  $    218,562 Vice President National
S D Gerie  $     151,738  $     39,697  $    191,435 Vice President National
D D Joynt  $     149,638  $     82,849  $    232,487 Vice President National
M E Gekas  $     137,748  $     50,467  $    188,215 Assistant to President National
C R Hogue  $     150,601  $     22,218  $    172,819 Director of Government affairs National
C D Leidy  $     118,352  $     48,906  $    167,258 Assistant IT Director National
W A Bon  $     158,089  $       6,649  $    164,738 General Counsel National
R A Inclima  $     150,601  $       9,679  $    160,280 Director Safety/Education National
P E Kennedy  $     141,784  $     13,140  $    154,924 Executive assistant to President National
C C Ballew  $     135,724  $       4,215  $    139,939 Director Communications National
T McCall  $     114,118  $     23,782  $    137,900 Director Organizing National
G L Hart  $     132,065  $       2,817  $    134,882 Assistant to President National
M K Osborne  $     126,407  $       1,947  $    128,354 Executive Assistant to Secretary Treasurer National
M J Schappaugh  $     123,239  $       4,681  $    127,920 Assistant to President National
C H Dall  $     110,607  $     15,919  $    126,526 Internal organizing Coordinator National
R T Forbes  $     126,407  $               –  $    126,407 IT Director National
K D Evanski  $     114,118  $       1,789  $    115,907 NRAB 3rd division member National
A K Krajewski  $     106,160  $       1,707  $    107,867 Controller National
A M Mulford  $     106,199  $       1,130  $    107,329 Public law board National
Jack David  $     102,196  $     11,483  $    113,679 General Chairman Affiliated
Gary Marquart  $     108,419  $     30,213  $    138,632 General Chairman ATSFFSF
David Carroll  $     100,936  $     16,912  $    117,848 General Chairman Burlington Northern
Hayward Granier  $     101,927 $   103,495  $    205,422 General Chairman *2017 Illinois Central Gulf
Jed Dodd  $     102,506  $     10,049  $    112,555 General Chairman Penn Fed
Dennis Albers  $     155,642  $     48,423  $    204,065 General Chairman Allied Fed
L.A. Buckley  $      12,023  $     18,073  $    130,096 1st vice chairman Allied Fed
Roy Griffith  $     102,101  $     16,603  $    118,704 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Andrew Shelton  $     101,600  $       7,865  $    109,465 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
M.R. Farmer  $     101,600  $     23,447  $    125,047 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Nathaniel Trawick  $     101,600  $     20,130  $    121,730 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Scotty Niswonger  $     101,600  $     30,454  $    132,054 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Pedro Amaro  $     101,600  $     24,695  $    126,295 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Brian Thies  $     108,096  $     17,322  $    125,418 1st Vice Chairman Allied Fed
James Knight  $     102,248  $       5,325  $    107,573 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Patrick Quigley  $     101,901  $       8,293  $    110,194 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Ricky Richard  $     101,600  $     18,921  $    120,521 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Brian Thompson  $     101,600  $     11,086  $    112,686 Vice Chairman Allied Fed
Louis Below  $     119,647  $     18,622  $    138,269 General Chairman USD
Galen Owen  $     109,163  $     10,259  $    119,422 1st Vice Chairman USD
Ricardo Canchola  $     101,853  $       5,652  $    107,505 Vice Chairman USD
Tony Cardwell  $     102,966  $     20,750  $    123,716 Vice Chairman USD
Jeff Rankin  $     101,853  $     15,706  $    117,559 Vice Chairman USD
Brian Rumler  $     103,708  $     15,473  $    119,181 Vice Chairman USD
Andrew Murphy  $     101,853  $     19,395  $    121,248 Vice Chairman USD
Renne Perez  $     101,853  $       8,741  $    110,594 Vice Chairman USD
Michael Hallgren  $     101,853  $     19,395  $    121,248 Vice Chairman USD
Adam Allen  $     101,853  $     10,208  $    112,061 Vice Chairman USD
Samuel Alexander  $     101,227  $     17,021  $    118,248 General Chairman Southern
James Hoffa  $     309,927  $     76,417  $    386,344 General President IBT
Richard Ken Hall  $     210,692  $     72,584  $    283,276 General Secretary- Treasurer IBT
John Murphy  $     155,355  $     30,014  $    185,369 International Vice President
Director of Rail Conference
IBT

BMWED Members   36,083

Teamster Rail Conference Members   92,728

 

BROTHERHOOD OF RAILWAY SIGNALMEN (BRS)

BRS  Gross Salary  Expenses  Total Comp Position Division
Willard Picket  $      156,730  $      95,423  $       252,153 President National
Jerry Boles  $      127,636  $      70,506  $       198,142 Secretary Treasurer National
Floyd Mason  $      121,665  $    102,051  $       223,716 Vice President National
Joe Matttingly  $      121,665  $      60,082  $       181,747 Vice President National
Dennis Boston  $      121,665  $      73,165  $       194,830 Vice President National
           
Kelly Haley  $      121,655  $      18,601  $       140,256 Vice President National
Jonathan Bragg  $      117,159  $      37,795  $       154,954 Vice President National
Michael Baldwin  $        73,114  $      36,021  $       109,135 Vice President National
Leonard Parker  $      111,742  $      33,615  $       145,357 Grand Lodge Rep National
James Finnegan  $      106,676  $      21,857  $       128,533 Grand Lodge Rep National
Timothy Tarrant  $      106,822  $      30,680  $       137,502 Grand Lodge Rep National
Nathan Estes  $      155,204  $        7,394  $       162,598 Grand Lodge Rep National
Ronald Demott  $      133,284
$          5,671
 $      41,787
$         1,936
 $       182,678 General Chairman,
Trustee
General Committee 3690,
National
Ronald Behrens  $      108931

$        16673

 $     34,152
$       3,413
 $       163,169 General Chairman,
Recording/Financial Secretary
General Committee 88,
Local Lodge 8
Joseph Doucet  $      111,019  $      52,598  $       163,617 Vice General Chairman General Committee 88
James Glasser  $      102,611  $      21,385  $       123,996 Vice General Chairman General Committee 88
John McArthur  $      116,420  $      82,750  $       199,170 General Chairman General Committee 88
David Ingersoll  $      102,363  $      14,752  $       117,115 General Chairman General Committee 62
Jason Worcester  $      104,681  $      69,125  $       173,806 General Chairman General Committee 60
Jason Harkleroad  $      104,681  $      54,309  $       158,990 Assistant General Chairman General Committee 60
Kurt Mullins  $      111,695  $      32,047  $       143,742 General Chairman General Committee 58
Gregory Vincent  $      117,321  $                 –  $       117,321 General Chairman General Committee 44
Michael Dake  $      115,113  $      38,166  $       153,279 General Chairman General Committee 12
Kelly Portlock  $      106,410  $      33,006  $       139,416 Vice General Chairman General Committee 12
Kenneth Strickland  $      103,128  $        6,186  $       109,314 Secretary Treasurer General Committee 12
Jeremy Huckabee  $      103,128  $        8,422  $       111,550 Assistant General Chairman General Committee 12

BRS Members 11,207

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MACHINISTS AND AEROSPACE WORKERS (IAMAW)

IAM Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position District
Jeffrey Doerr  $       154,207  $   25,427  $    179,634 President/ DIR GC 19
John Lacey  $       142,386  $   80,529  $    222,915 President/ DIR GC 19
Richard Nadeau  $       124,862  $   19,632  $    144,494 Secretary Treasurer 19
Derrick Battle  $       116,743  $   32,587  $    149,330 General Chairman 19
Lisa Carter  $       115,177  $   16,576  $    131,753 General Chairman 19
James Davis  $       117,273  $   39,794  $    157,067 General Chairman 19
John Denny  $       116,643  $   40,282  $    156,925 General Chairman 19
James Jacob  $       116,780  $   21,914  $    138,694 General Chairman 19
Joseph May  $         87,812  $   13,966  $    101,778 Organizer 19
Michael McCarthy  $       117,231  $   30,863  $    148,094 General Chairman 19
Gary Naylor Jr  $       116,830  $   50,219  $    167,049 General Chairman 19
Brian Orwan  $       125,548  $   43,820  $    169,368 General Chairman 19
James Perry  $       117,910  $   39,406  $    157,316 General Chairman 19
Andrew Sandberg  $       117,230  $   29,606  $    146,836 General Chairman 19
Robert Martinez  $       266,013  $   76,364  $    342,377 International President National
Dora Cervantes  $       202,503  $   71,201  $    273,704 General Secretary Treasurer National

IAM Members 25,313

 

 

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF BOILERMAKERS (IBB)

IBB Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
John Mansker  $     85,512  $   52,011  $      137,523 Director Railroad Division Services
Chris Browning  $     74,027  $   68,006  $      142,033 International Representative
Newton Jones  $   435,240  $ 317,990  $      753,230 International President International
William Creeden  $   332,627  $ 102,168  $      434,795 Secretary Treasurer International

IBB Members   800

 

 

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS (IBEW)

IBEW Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
Lonnie Stephenson  $       361,477  $     74,119  $       435,596 International President International
Salvatore Chilia  $       319,374  $     64,426  $       383,800 Secretary/Treasurer International
William Bohne  $       177,232  $     18,011  $       195,243 Railroad Director International
James Wisniski  $       103,875  $       4,348  $       108,223 General Chairman System Council 2
Don Tortorice  $         97,915  $       8,598  $       106,513 Vice General Chairman System Council 2
Randy Shell  $       100,275  $       5,883  $       106,158 Secretary Treasurer System Council 2
David Starkjohann  $         97,915  $       6,383  $       104,298 Assistant GC System Council 2
Dale Doyle  $       114,777  $     31,421  $       146,198 General Chairman System Council 16
Mark Klecka  $       105,760  $     32,696  $       138,456 Vice Chairman System Council 16
Jeff Allred  $       104,560  $     37,717  $       142,277 Assistant GC System Council 16
Darrell Patterson  $       104,560  $     21,878  $       126,438 Assistant GC System Council 16

IBEW Members 4656

 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF FIREMAN AND OILERS (NCFO)- SERVICE EMPLOYEES INTERNATIONAL UNION (SEIU)

NCFO/SEIU Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
John Thacker  $     175,826  $   26,167  $    201,993 President NCFO
Dean Devita  $     140,005  $   24,375  $    164,380 Secretary Treasurer NCFO
Jim Larreau  $       87,300  $   55,852  $    143,152 General Chairman NCFO
Robert Smith  $       84,589  $   42,265  $    126,854 Business Agent NCFO
Richard Edmonds  $       82,347  $   25,003  $    107,350 General Chairman NCFO
Michael Wood  $       82,347  $   21,898  $    104,245 Union Representative NCFO
Terry Rome  $       70,256  $   32,383  $    102,639 Union Representative NCFO
Michael Pistone  $       82,347  $   29,419  $    111,766 Union Representative NCFO
Kyle Bragg  $     195,435  $   11,688  $    207,123 Secretary Treasurer District 32BJ
Hector Figueroa  $     214,020  $   10,096  $    224,116 President District 32BJ
Mary Kay Henry  $     251,522  $   30,589  $    282,111 International President SEIU
Gerald Hudson  $     209,843  $   23,583  $    233,426 International Sec- Treasurer SEIU

 

SMART, Sheetmetal, Air, Rail, Transportation

SMART Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
Joseph Lapresta  $     153,137  $    37,021  $    190,158 General Chairperson GC 1
Randy Doyle  $     145,261  $    22,991  $    168,252 Associate Chairperson GC 1
Scott Anderson  $     145,261  $    18,215  $    163,476 Associate Chairperson GC 1
Jeremy Brown  $     145,261  $      7,614  $    152,875 Associate Chairperson GC 1
Nathan Macdonald  $     145,261  $      7,948  $    153,209 Associate Chairperson GC 1
Brent Lind  $     145,261  $      5,331  $    150,592 Associate Chairperson GC 1
Joe Lopez  $     158,770  $    12,686  $    171,456 General Chairperson GC 9
Donald Dutton  $     145,440  $         297  $    145,737 Vice Chairperson GC 9
Scott Swiatek  $     145,440  $    12,502  $    157,942 Secretary GC 9
Daniel L Young  $     161,620  $    23,205  $    184,825 General Chairperson GC 17
Richard O’Connell  $     147,784  $      6,145  $    153,929 Secretary GC 17
Tommy Pate  $       78,008  $    35,643  $    113,651 General Chairperson GC 20
Steven Mavity  $     188,410  $    15,386  $    203,796 General Chairperson GC 49
Jamie Modesitt  $     153,266  $    10,568  $    163,834 Vice Chairperson GC 49
Erik Belew  $     144,854  $      4,477  $    149,331 Vice Chairperson GC 49
Richard Lee  $     144,854  $      3,993  $    148,847 Assistant Chairperson GC 49
Michael Reedy  $     168,485  $      6,919  $    175,404 General Chairperson GC  225
Jerry Kalbfell  $     142,444  $      4,690  $    147,134 General Chairperson GC 225
Larry Miller  $     133,854  $    31,567  $    165,421 General Chairperson GC 386
Chadrick Adams  $     139,998  $    12,255  $    152,253 General Chairperson GC 393
Rogers Crawford  $     137,581  $    45,851  $    183,432 General Chairperson GC 433
Samuel Habjan  $       93,857  $      8,285  $    102,142 General Chairperson GC 457
Anthony Simon  $     205,806  $    13,428  $    219,234 General Chairperson GC 505
Vincent Tessitore  $     191,821  $                –  $    191,821 Vice Chairperson GC 505
Dale Barnett  $     124,417  $      2,123  $    126,540 General Chairperson GC 513
Brian Killough  $     106,556  $      3,546  $    110,102 Assistant Chairperson GC 513
Charles Nowlin  $     188,410  $    30,233  $    218,643 General Chairperson GC 569
Terry Dixon  $     134,451  $      6,801  $    141,252 Vice Chairperson GC 569
Roy Davis  $     140,450  $    14,973  $    155,423 General Chairperson GC 577
Christopher Goodrum  $     100,749  $         203  $    100,952 Vice Chairperson GC 577
Charles Piland  $     100,749  $      5,207  $    105,956 Secretary GC577
James Houk  $     103,914  $      7,669  $    111,583 General Chairperson GC 680
Jason Boswell  $     187,933  $      3,093  $    191,026 General Chairperson GC 687
Guy Frederick  $     138,855  $         286  $    139,141 Assistant Chairperson GC 687
Dirk Sampson  $     184,446  $    26,841  $    211,287 General Chairperson GC 769
Richard Pauli  $     137,468  $      6,448  $    143,916 Secretary GC 769
John Whitaker  $     139,560  $      7,387  $    146,947 General Chairperson GC 851
Joe Bennett  $     129,307  $      4,786  $    134,093 Vice Chairperson GC 851
Gary Crest  $     158,399  $    16,854  $    175,253 General Chairperson GC 887
David Patenaude  $     133,137  $    10,292  $    143,429 Vice Chairperson GC 887
William Campbell  $     135,368  $      4,835  $    140,203 Vice Chairperson GC 887
Mark Cook  $     145,200  $    16,085  $    161,285 General Chairperson GC 898
Thomas Gholson  $     142,229  $      7,891  $    150,120 Assistant Chairperson GC 898
Stephen Simpson  $     149,160  $    26,701  $    175,861 General Chairperson GC 927
Joseph Chelette  $     104,184  $    25,805  $    129,989 Vice Chairperson GC 927
Brent Leonard  $     160,888  $    37,647  $    198,535 General Chairperson GC 953
Robert Warth  $     129,977  $    13,079  $    143,056 Vice Chairperson GC 953
Luke Edington  $     129,977  $      2,079  $    132,056 Vice Chairperson GC 953
Ian Reynolds  $     127,120  $      1,289  $    128,409 Vice Chairperson GC 953
Kenneth Flashberger  $     122,108  $      3,328  $    125,436 General Chairperson GC 987
John Previsich  $     354,008  $    63,564  $    417,572 International President Transportation Division
David Weir  $     188,410  $    29,990  $    218,400 Vice President Transportation Division
John Lesniewski  $     224,683  $    39,111  $    263,794 Vice President Transportation Division
Troy johnson  $     188,410  $    38,363  $    226,773 Vice President Transportation Division
John England  $     188,410  $    54,856  $    243,266 Vice President Transportation Division
Joseph Sellers  $     336,097  $ 134,650  $    470,747 General President International
Richard McClees  $     285,683  $ 147,069  $    432,752 General Secretary- Treasurer International
John Risch  $     219,692  $    37,827  $    257,519 National Legislative Director International

 

SMART Members 41,912

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TCU/ IAM Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
Robert Scardelletti  $      322,256  $163,198  $     485,454 National President National
Russell Oathout  $      225,905  $162,175  $     388,080 National Secretary National
Mark Sellers  $        74,091  $  39,546  $     113,637 General Chairman Lodge 5101
Joel Parker  $      242,881  $187,676  $     430,557 Assistant to National President National
Stanley Boyd  $      184,978  $174,214  $     359,192 Vice President National
Richard Johnson  $      183,275  $176,496  $     359,771 Vice President National
Ronald Kloos  $      183,275  $107,641  $     290,916 Vice President National
Arthur Maratea  $      183,275  $185,526  $     368,801 Vice President National
Thomas Truhler  $      183,275  $  84,695  $     267,970 Vice President National
Matthew Hollis  $      127,138  $130,762  $     257,900 National Representative National
Carl Tingle  $      162,925  $145,033  $     307,958 Assistant General President National
Donald Grissom  $      152,508  $146,986  $     299,494 General Vice President National
Steven Wilhelm  $      136,090  $  19,514  $     155,604 Executive Director of Con National
Diane Dettmann  $      135,970  $  30,049  $     166,019 Senior Executive Director National
David Gifford  $      135,970  $    9,030  $     145,000 Exec DIR- Communications National
Cathleen Parker  $      129,013  $    6,988  $     136,001 Director Personnel National
Robert Scardeletti II  $      129,525  $       295  $     129,820 Assistant General Counsel National
Kristin Blakely  $      129,283  $   2,870  $     132,153 Executive Director National
Randy Bower  $      124,960  $ 51,480  $     176,440 National Representative National
Kevin Loftin  $      124,960  $ 84,648  $     209,608 National Representative National
Ellen Conboy  $      122,035  $ 30,536  $     152,571 Executive Director National
John Dinsdale  $      122,035  $ 49,832  $     171,867 National Representative National
Mary Gunn  $      122,035  $ 36,108  $     158,143 National Representative National
Steven Hirschbein  $      122,035  $ 39,070  $     161,105 National Representative National
Carl Lakin  $      122,035  $ 71,915  $     193,950 National Representative National
Michael Miller  $      122,035  $ 48,367  $     170,402 National Representative National
Robert Ragland  $      122,035  $ 31,013  $     153,048 National Representative National
Timothy Sandberg  $      122,035  $ 43,496  $     165,531 National Representative National
Mark Taylor  $      122,035  $ 54,739  $     176,774 Assistant Legislative Director National
Robert Keppen  $      116,385  $ 38,461  $     154,846 National Representative National
Roshawn Taylor  $      110,306  $      582  $     110,888 National Representative National
Gregory Burnett  $      108,475  $ 66,634  $     175,109 Assistant National Rep National
Franklin Canter  $      108,475  $ 98,644  $     207,119 Assistant National Rep National
Jason Cox  $      108,475  $ 53,559  $     162,034 Assistant National Rep National
Fletcher Goble  $      108,475  $ 24,698  $     133,173 Assistant National Rep National
Brian Sota  $      108,475  $ 24,698  $     133,173 Assistant National Rep National
Darren Treiber  $      108,475  $ 57,951  $     166,426 Assistant National Rep National
Dennis Wilson  $      108,475  $ 59,531  $     168,006 Assistant National Rep National
Ana Calaventinos  $      108,212  $   8,518  $     116,730 Administrative Assistant National
Barbara Wrightson  $      108,205  $ 11,072  $     119,277 Administrative Assistant National
William Kelaher  $      107,432  $ 57,383  $     164,815 Assistant Legislative Director National
Michele Reese  $      105,232  $   8,067  $     113,299 Director National
William DeCarlo  $      105,155  $ 49,250  $     154,405 National Representative National
Robert Conroy  $      104,523  $      190  $     104,713 Manager of Accounting National
Lawrence Jones  $      100,587  $ 30,130  $     130,717 National Representative National
Marianne Steyer  $        99,320  $      943  $     100,263 Manager Accounts National
Allison Parker  $        94,548  $ 19,495  $     114,043 Director National
John Jackson  $        87,876  $ 30,267  $     118,143 National Representative National
Joel Hernandez  $        86,985  $ 21,931  $     108,916 Manager of Curriculum National
Robert Lee  $        84,138  $ 17,493  $     101,631 Assistant National Representative National

 TRANSPORTATION COMMUNICATIONS UNION (TCU)- INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MACHINISTS AND AEROSPACE WORKERS (IAMAW)

TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION (TWU)

TWU Gross Salary Expenses Total Comp Position Division
Latonya Crisp-Sauray  $     119,482  $ 24,035  $    143,517 Recording Secretary National
Ricahrd Davis  $     115,639  $ 16,656  $    132,295 Vice President National
Derrick Echevarria  $     117,925  $   2,734  $    120,659 Vice President National
Angel Giboyeaux  $     110,400  $ 14,949  $    125,349 Vice President National
John Patafio  $     118,229  $ 18,742  $    136,971 Vice President National
Earl Phillips  $     122,424  $ 18,312  $    140,736 Secretary Treasurer National
Kia Phua  $     116,906  $ 12,193  $    129,099 Vice President National
Nelson Rivera  $     118,379  $ 11,265  $    129,644 Vice President National
Peter Rosconi  $     114,088  $   8,557  $    122,645 Vice President National
John Samuelson  $                0  $ 21,765  $      21,765 President National
Anthony Utano  $     120,842  $ 16,837  $    137,679 Vice President National
Brussadr Alston  $     104,057  $             –  $    104,057 Employee National
Daniel Ascoma  $     101,949  $             –  $    101,949 Employee National
Joseph Bermudez  $     105,463  $ 13,236  $    118,699 Employee National
Jack Blazejewicz  $     106,250  $             –  $    106,250 Employee National
Eugene Bleynis  $     102,099  $             –  $    102,099 Employee National
John Chiarello  $     110,485  $             –  $    110,485 Employee National
John Day  $     106,646  $   3,060  $    109,706 Employee National
Peter Donohue  $     137,492  $   3,877  $    141,369 Employee National
Stephen Downs  $     105,950  $             –  $    105,950 Employee National
James Gannon  $     113,441  $ 13,806  $    127,247 Employee National
Steve Higgins  $     105,757  $             –  $    105,757 Employee National
Marvin Holland  $     106,339  $ 37,053  $    143,392 Employee National
Dalia Lamming  $     113,441  $   3,771  $    117,212 Employee National
Thomas Lenane  $     113,941  $ 14,957  $    128,898 Employee National
Frank McCann  $     113,941  $ 34,772  $    148,713 Employee National
Gary McGlinchey  $     106,445  $   9,008  $    115,453 Employee National
Ghadban Moghrabi  $     101,990  $             –  $    101,990 Employee National
William Mooney  $     106,450  $             –  $    106,450 Employee National
Paul Navarro  $     106,250  $ 13,466  $    119,716 Employee National
William Rivera  $     106,150  $   1,180  $    107,330 Employee National
Richard Rocco  $     110,668  $       361  $    111,029 Employee National
Betzabeth Sanchez  $     105,248  $             –  $    105,248 Employee National
Arthur Schwartz  $     107,161  $             –  $    107,161 Employee National
Retu Singla  $     112,187  $   1,309  $    113,496 Employee National
Charise Syville  $     105,944  $   2,100  $    108,044 Employee National
Robert Taylor III  $     100,082  $             –  $    100,082 Employee National
Donald Yates  $     105,861  $             –  $    105,861 Employee National
Crystal Young  $     105,122  $             –  $    105,122 Employee National

 


Debs and Quote on VotingRWU Banner Proof 2008

Railroad Workers United – Resolution Against Fascism, Nazism & White Supremacy

Whereas, fascist states throughout history have violently suppressed workers and their unions, sought to increase the exploitation of workers or even enslave them, stripped citizens of freedom of speech/freedom of movement, and sparked violent conflict domestically and abroad; and

Whereas, a basic hallmark of fascist regimes is the subjugation and/or outright elimination of unions and workers’ movements, including the execution, torture, exile, and general persecution of union organizers, activists and leaders, and

Whereas, German Nazism grew out of the devastation of a WWI ravished country, a fascist and racist ideology that scapegoated Jews, Gypsies, foreigners, and unions for the country’s economic woes which resulted in the murder of millions of civilians, and was defeated only at a horrific cost by the Allied forces in WWII – including the lives of thousands of Americans and Canadians – and only after 60 million had died in the war; and

Whereas, white supremacy – a fascist and racist ideology historically promoted by the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis, apartheid South Africa, neo-confederate movements, and now by many newly formed alt-right groups – insists on the superiority of White Americans over other ethnicities which make up the country, advocating terrorism and genocide against them, the expulsion of undocumented immigrants, and the banning of others – based on religion and ethnicity – from immigrating to the U.S.; and

Whereas, historically, many rail companies benefitted greatly from these ideologies, making super profits by first exploiting slave labor and later Jim Crow in the South, Chinese immigrants in the west, and by keeping the railroad workforce divided by race, national origin, etc.; and

Whereas, the Ku Klux Klan has historically driven a wedge between workers, targeting not just Black workers but Jews, Catholics, Italians, Polish, Hungarians and numerous others, staging anti-union rallies and other actions, serving as employer vigilantes to violently break strikes and attacking social movements of poor and working-class people, all assisting the effort by the wealthy to keep workers divided and unions weak; and

Whereas, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka has officially condemned President Trump’s remarks on the terrorist attack in Charlottesville, and several unions have taken a firm stand against these ideologies; and

Whereas, these ideologies are completely incompatible with the principles of building solidarity among all workers within the workplace, the local union, and the labor movement as a whole; and

Whereas, these ideologies are completely opposed to RWU’s principles of building unity, solidarity and democracy among all railroad workers; and

Whereas, these anti-worker/anti-union ideologies are seeing a resurgence within the United States and seek to destroy the life, liberty and happiness of thousands of American railroad workers;

Therefore, be it Resolved that RWU condemns these ideologies, and any attempts by RWU members or others to spread fascist, Nazi or white supremacist ideas within our organization; and

Be it Further Resolved that RWU members are encouraged to discuss with fellow railroaders why any growth of these ideologies will harm all railroad workers, our unions and our society as a whole; and

Be it Finally Resolved that RWU encourages railroad workers to study the history of workers who have lived under fascism, Nazism and white supremacy to gain a deeper understanding of why these ideologies pose a grave threat to our livelihoods, our solidarity, our unity, and our freedom to organize.

 

Adopted by the RWU Steering Committee 10/21/17

RWU